New Coaching modules/pathway?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by 4_the_kids, Jun 2, 2016.

  1. 4_the_kids

    4_the_kids Active Member

    Messages:
    312
    Ratings:
    +131 / 3
    Anyone seen this new coach pathway/model. Looks lie B-pretest is replaced by C provincial which becomes to pre req for a new Childrenss License ( development stream). I would assume that will be for coaches coaching development teams U8-U12 and in academies.

    I think this is a positive step, albeit a bit costly for those interested in perusing it. We spend much time talking about the cost of BCSPL how about the cost of the coaching pathway... Needs to be more affordable to get larger by in. C license is $800 dollars for example, so i could only assume one would be looking at up to 5K+ to get all the courses. Clubs due help support some coaches especially at the community stream, but even still its a large investment for a club to train a coach...

    [​IMG]
     
  2. TKBC

    TKBC Established Member

    Messages:
    1,233
    Ratings:
    +139 / 7
    Updating and reviewing coach education regularly by the BCSA is a great decision. I have Prov-B and have to take the courses geared towards u8-12 anyway. This is fine, happy to do it. LOL wonder which of the B Licenses have now - 1 or 2 ;)

    Coach education is wonderful. But in addition to these courses that are expensive (it appears) to run (and enter!) there must be regular, ongoing, BCSA/CSA-provided FREE coaching courses. Can be online. Can include videos. Can include teleconferences that coaches call into. Should be a web site where people can view video's of sessions put on by our supposed top coaches (and maybe the Whitecaps could chip in).

    We are not going to develop players just by updating these coaching courses. We need a far more comprehensive program.
     
  3. 4_the_kids

    4_the_kids Active Member

    Messages:
    312
    Ratings:
    +131 / 3
    Agreed, coach education is only part of the solution, and unfortunately having the certificate doesn't mean you are a good coach
     
  4. TKBC

    TKBC Established Member

    Messages:
    1,233
    Ratings:
    +139 / 7
    You are right, but that's not what I was saying. I mean there need to be regular, ongoing courses in a variety of venues (in-person, teleconference, video conference, web site with resources including articles and videos for download), BCSA-enforced standards of coaching practice (not just coaching certs, but actually about what is happening at training - skills/tactic message/acquisition). Every TD should be trained to provide this. Offering/requiring coaching sessions to volunteer parents on a rainy Sunday night - difficult. Offering/requiring volunteer parents coaching sessions online in their pajama's, much easier to sell.

    Am I the perfect coach? Not even close. But, what I write above is exactly the kind of guidance I want.

    I appreciate the Whitecaps for at least offering some, and the Pacific Coaching program (forget the name) that's held, I think it's this weekend, is another good one! But we need much more provided directly by BCSA.
     
  5. 4_the_kids

    4_the_kids Active Member

    Messages:
    312
    Ratings:
    +131 / 3
    Very true, I think there should also be a 'maintenance' requirement to maintain your current status. This would be similar to what you say above, coaches required to continue /refresh their education on ongoing basis, as well on field evaluations every couple of years.
     
  6. socceroo

    socceroo Member

    Messages:
    68
    Ratings:
    +6 / 0
    I do agree the there should be a refresher requirement for coaches program built into the pathway.

    As for cost - should a non issue.

    Some of us who coach for money or ref for money make a significant coin as part timers.

    Charging $50 per child for month for being a paid coach and $45 to $80 for reffing really is a kicker.

    Now if clubs have to cough up money than we are just spoiling coaches and feel the pinch.
     
  7. 4_the_kids

    4_the_kids Active Member

    Messages:
    312
    Ratings:
    +131 / 3
    With the current success of Iceland in the Euro Cup there has been some looking into what has made such a small nation so successful. One major takeaway the CANADA SOCCER needs to listen to is :
    Large investment in coaching education and standards.
    Ensuring professional coaches are teaching the youngest of player.

    Now a few posts above I outlined the new coach pathway , which I think will help. We need to break down the financial barriers and increase the accountability / what it takes to become a certified /pro coach. Mentoring the C and new children's license takers. Ensuring these coaches have an in depth understanding of technique and the how to teach as well as the game itself.

    This of course will take several years and should start with our much talked about proposed change to competitive and recreational streams. I propose the following as a min , with the idea of mentoring, increased accountability and qualifications/ testing for every course.

    All U5-U7 should be club run programs with professional / staff coaches running the programs.
    All U8-U12 development teams should have at least one weekly academy session with staff coaches, and if not a staff coach coaching the team then highly qualified volunteers with both the qualification and demonstrated ability - I would say to start a min C license and working towards the new skill licenses.
    U8-U12 recreational or community teams - all coaches should have a min the community courses.
    U13-U18
    BCSPL - A License
    Metro - B license part II ( national B )
    Div 1 - B license part I ( provincial B)
    Div 2 -3 - C license
    Div 4 - community courses trained status ( soccer for life with MED)

    Thoughts?
     
  8. TKBC

    TKBC Established Member

    Messages:
    1,233
    Ratings:
    +139 / 7
    u8-12 the coaches are required to have the community courses already.

    BCSPL does require the A license (doesn't it?). Below that you'll have difficulty with requiring licenses simply because a community may not have a coach with that license for every age and both genders, and no one is going to move into a community to coach one of these teams for a honorarium, or you simply might not have coaches in your community who want to get those certifications.

    It's not a simple case of getting certifications.

    You have to have mentorship, and ongoing reviews of practice standards - and you need a TD that is very good at PR and networking to get coaches to buy into a desired system of play and development.

    Also, as a province we need to have the same system of development/play and have that enforced by the provincial body.

    We also need to change our model to be much more accessible - in-house courses, online courses, regional conferences bringing all coaches/clubs together from within a district for a day or two days.
     
  9. 4_the_kids

    4_the_kids Active Member

    Messages:
    312
    Ratings:
    +131 / 3
    Yes it will take significant investment from Canada soccer and the provincial bodies to get coaches properly educated. Even in the small communities and clubs i think we can get more trained coaches, in most cases these teams in small communities are going to be more recreational than competitive teams, for small towns really need whitecaps, provincial teams and BCSPL looking for the few that should be playing higher levels. Whitecaps run an academy in the Kootenays and Prince George as an example of ways to improve coaching in those smaller towns,
    For anyone playing in the coastal area there is no excuse to not have access to better coaching and to not have to pay huge dollars in private academies to find them. ...Its all about the commitment to do so, changing the mentality.
    Iceland has 350,000 people ,WIth 400 UEFA B or higher coaches for a ratio of 1 qualified coach per 825 people. Whats the ratio in the Lower mainlaind for National B or higher which has 75,000 kids playing soccer? There is a hot bed of soccer happening in the lower mainland right now, especially in Surrey, South Surrey / Whiterock , South Delta , Burnaby and Coquitlam. lets get better coaching to these kids and quickly while the momentum is there.

    Currently only a B national is required for BCSPL.....there is a time line to be National A eventually...

    There should be a further course for TD's that focuses on program development and implementation including the PR work..

    Anyways there is too much for a simple forum post.... I think my point is made, and I agree with everything you say as well
     
  10. easoccer

    easoccer Established Member

    Messages:
    854
    Ratings:
    +267 / 2
    I fully agree that the early years (u5-12) are the most important for a young player. Not only are they the years that children are learning important basic skills but also a love for the game.

    We need coaches who can teach proper technical skills to the children but also engage them in an exciting, friendly and fun way.

    Fun keeps them coming back.

    It is too important as task to take lightly.
     
  11. TKBC

    TKBC Established Member

    Messages:
    1,233
    Ratings:
    +139 / 7
    I'll update your statement to "I fully agree that the early years (u5-u9) are the most important for a young player. Having spent 3 years with 9-11 year olds I can tell you if they haven't learned good habits/tekkers by that age it's going to be exceptionally difficult for that player to achieve the good habits/tekkers after that age - unless they hit the park every single day themselves to teach themselves good habits. 2 or 3 training sessions a week with a team isn't gonna do it.

    People say we need "the best" coaches for those little guys - No, we need "the best coaches for that age" this is to say guys who can teach the essential/basic skills, through demonstration and verbally. They must be able to encourage and build-up the player emotionally. They must not care about results whatsoever.

    What you said is wonderful - I do believe the tide is turning and clubs are increasingly taking this stance.
     
  12. 4_the_kids

    4_the_kids Active Member

    Messages:
    312
    Ratings:
    +131 / 3
    If I could, i would challenge this statement with this. I have a U 13 Div.1 team - a team created from evaluations, picked by club TD and staff, I had input in the evaluation of players I knew but not the team selection, in fact I was asked to coach the team after the selections were made. On this Team 2 players played U12 Div 1. ( rest of that team made BCSPL or Metro) , 9 players were from the div 2 ( this was expected) , 3 players were from the Div 3 ( team I previously coached) , 2 were from house, and 1 has never played organized soccer before.
    Of this group the 2 Div 1 player have had the most and highest quality of training followed by the div 2 players ( both from in house , staff coaches and from provate academies such a sFC Barcelona) . I can tell you there is little difference from the those players and the other players from lower levels with less training( no staff coach, no private academies) . In fact the new player might be one of the best players on this team . The benefit from the coaching and academies was with the 14 or so that made BCSPL or Metro, the ones with true drive.
    My point here is its not just the coaching, its a mentality that comes from within the player. What we need to be doing is making sure we are offering the best possible coaching so those kids with the intrinsic drive have it available to them. The notion the we can create or manufacture a player is false, kids need more free play to become truly creative. There are too many of these private sessions, academies, money grabs etc.. Also need to be playing other sports in the off season to help better physical development, and prevent both injury and burn out. Right now to many driven players have poor coaching or access and are getting burnt out playing year round ( this is a major problem for the Newton area)
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree For Most Part Agree For Most Part x 1
    • List
  13. TKBC

    TKBC Established Member

    Messages:
    1,233
    Ratings:
    +139 / 7
    Yes, which is why I said "unless they hit the park every single day themselves to teach themselves." The kids need the best coaches available for their respective age groups. At age 5-9 you need a coach who can teach tekkers, and encourage them to love the game. But in the end, it's the x-factor, the intrinsic within the player, not the coach.

    Not sure what you are actually challenging. I never said coaches create players. Coaches encourage players who have internal drive. No coach taught Messi to be Messi. He was guided though, absolutely.
     
  14. 4_the_kids

    4_the_kids Active Member

    Messages:
    312
    Ratings:
    +131 / 3
    I was challenging the idea - Having spent 3 years with 9-11 year olds I can tell you if they haven't learned good habits/tekkers by that age it's going to be exceptionally difficult for that player to achieve the good habits/tekkers after that age . I missed the fact you followed it with unless they hit the park every single day themselves to teach themselves good habits.


    My point was in some cases all the extra training in the world doesn't matter , there is some kid who has never player who is just a good if not better.
     
  15. TKBC

    TKBC Established Member

    Messages:
    1,233
    Ratings:
    +139 / 7
    You and I are on the same page. It's all good.

    I only achieved the level I did because I worked my ass off at the park or in my back yard every day (not that I reached a high high level or anything, but wouldn't have reached the one I did without putting in the work). 2-3 practices a week is not even in the same galaxy as "enough."
     
  16. Legend

    Legend Member

    Messages:
    51
    Ratings:
    +6 / 3

    This is a good post and for sure going the right direction. For me, I went to the States to get my education and will continue to do so. The American USSF stream for me is far more in depth with MLS qualified instructors.
     
  17. Soccer_dude

    Soccer_dude Member

    Messages:
    67
    Ratings:
    +8 / 0
    Anyone take the new C License? Any thoughts on his it was ?
     
  18. Legend

    Legend Member

    Messages:
    51
    Ratings:
    +6 / 3
    Prepare to stop play, identify the problem, demo it, replay it, and go live.... thats probably all what they will cover. In my opinion, go down to Seattle and take the USSF E
     

Share This Page